Churro French Toast

If you’ve ever wanted to eat churros for breakfast, prepare yourself because all your dreams are about to come true. This recipe for churro french toast is one near and dear to my heart and also one of my favorite dishes from my childhood.

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In the town where I grew up just outside of Chicago, there was a restaurant we often went for breakfast or brunch, and churro french toast was my favorite thing on the menu. To this day, when I go home for a visit, I still order this dish. Now that I live too far away to go home very often, I’ve recreated a version of their recipe that tastes almost identical. They serve it drizzled with a caramel sauce, making it even more decadent. Make no mistake—it’s not a healthy dish by any means. It’s absolutely indulgent. But I guarantee if you love churros, you will love this recipe. And this dish is sure to be popular with your kids since it’s got a pastry-like quality to it that’s so delicious and sinful, they won’t believe you’re serving it to them for breakfast.

I like to serve this dish with sliced fruit and when I make it at home, I usually prefer to forgo the caramel sauce or syrup because it’s sweet and decadent enough without any syrup for me. A child-size serving is two sticks; three for adults. I can’t be held responsible if your family never wants to eat anything else for Sunday breakfast again!

A couple of notes on ingredients (includes some affiliate links):

  • To make your own cinnamon sugar easily, just measure out the amount of sugar called for in the recipe (I like Zulka brand Mexican cane sugar) and add ground cinnamon a half-teaspoon at a time, to taste, until you reach your desired ratio.
  • I always use challah (egg bread) for this dish, as it’s what was used in the original restaurant recipe and has the closest taste and texture to the inside of a churro, in my opinion.
  • I use safflower oil for frying because it’s a bit healthier choice, and is stable at high heat levels (read: it doesn’t splatter the way other hot oils do when frying, and it doesn’t stink up your kitchen like vegetable oil).
  • I prefer to use real vanilla beans for the concentrated, natural taste. If you don’t have those, in order of preference for substituting, you can use 1/2 teaspoon vanilla bean paste or 3/4 to one teaspoon of pure vanilla extract…. 

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Wordless Wednesday: Churros for dinner

During my trip to Mexico City a few weeks ago, there was one night that it got very chilly (and by very chilly in Mexico City in September, I mean about 57 degrees F). It doesn’t sound that cold—at least not to a Chicagoan used to blizzard weather—but without a jacket and the need for something warm in my belly, I wrapped myself in a fleece blanket while I chatted with my suegra and my cuñada about what we should have for dinner. After little discussion, we all agreed the best option was a trip to El Convento in San Ángel for churros and chocolate caliente. Pictured above is what ended up rolled in sugar and in my tummy. (Well, not ALL of it, but you get the idea.)

If you’re more than a few miles from the closest churrería, check out my recipe for making your own churros at home.

  • Where’s your favorite place to eat churros?

CHURROS

In the U.S., I’ve seen several different versions of churros. Make no mistake: none of them are very authentic. Some make my stomach churn at the thought (think theme park churros filled with chocolate or fruit-flavored goo), while others are passable for some quick cinnamon-sugar satisfaction during a desperate moment. It’s important to fry the pastry dough just right because if they’re over-fried, they’re just no good.

Churros WEB

churros

Several years ago when José and I were still dating, I made my first trip to the legendary Churrería El Moro in Mexico City. Founded in 1935, this cultural culinary gem is more than just a 75-year-old churro depot. It’s an incredible experience. The storefront has a big glass window so you can watch the churros being made. That alone makes it worth the trip. In fact, even famous Chicago-based chef Rick Bayless is rumored to have stood outside El Moro for hours upon hours when planning the concept for his new quick eatery, Xoco.

The waitresses at El Moro wear mustard-yellow diner uniforms with white trim and aprons. The blue, white and yellow patterned tiles, stained glass and yellow stucco walls inside are elements of any dream I have had dealing with churros ever since. (Yes, I dream about churros.) It’s all a part of the experience. With four types of hot chocolate to choose from and for the equivalent of a few dollars, you can’t go wrong when ordering churros y chocolate, especially in the chilly winter months. … 

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