How to keep your guacamole fresh and green

If you’ve ever woofed down a whole bowl of guacamole just to keep it from going brown in the refrigerator, your life is about to be changed. There is an easy way to keep your guacamole fresh and green—without using the pit, adding too much salt, covering it with water or any of the other “tricks” you might find with a quick Google search. I promise this tip is the green-guacamole-for-days jackpot!

My family is always asking me to make guacamole. Always. I make it for parties and barbecues, when people casually drop by and even when somebody calls and asks, “if I drop off the ingredients, will you make it for me?” My dad is by far the biggest culprit of the weekend phone call requesting a drive-by guacamole drop-off. Sometimes I tease him that if it weren’t for the guacamole, he wouldn’t stop by as often.

But with a jam-packed schedule and some travel time occasionally involved on one or both ends to get the ingredients and then deliver the goods to their final destination, it’s not always easy to make the guacamole and deliver and serve it right away. Yet, nobody would ever know that it’s usually been in the refrigerator for a full day beforehand because my guacamole always arrives perfectly green and fresh as if I just made it.

I’m going to reveal a method and kitchen tip that is going to turn you into a guacamole hero. But be warned; I can’t be held responsible if friends and family start calling to drop off ingredients because you earn a reputation for having the greenest guacamole they’ve ever seen!

Need a basic guacamole recipe? I’ve got you covered. Also check out my fruity guacamole recipe with pineapple and pomegranate seeds. You might also like my mango guacamole recipe.

The BEST way to keep guacamole fresh and green for days via theothersideofthetortilla.com

HOW TO KEEP YOUR GUACAMOLE FRESH AND GREEN

STEP 1: Choose avocados that are barely ripe. They should give only very slightly when you press the skin. Prep all the ingredients (onion, chile, lime, tomato, cilantro, etc.) before you cut the avocados open. The flesh should not be too creamy/soft when you open them and you shouldn’t find brown or dark spots on the flesh at all.

STEP 2: Make the guacamole as usual. Toss the pits—you won’t need them. Trust me.

STEP 3: Using plastic wrap, press the plastic directly against the top of the guacamole and seal along the edges of the dish until it’s as air-tight as possible. Bonus if you have a dish or tupperware that you can seal with plastic wrap and also put a lid on top to seal it again. The key is to prevent the avocado from being exposed to any air. This guacamole pictured below was refrigerated for 24 hours before being delivered to my dad, and it came out exactly the same shade of green as before it was refrigerated.

STEP 4: If you don’t eat all your leftovers in one sitting, smooth out the top with a spoon or spatula again and put the plastic wrap back on the same way before refrigerating.

I’ve managed to keep my guacamole green for up to three whole days, on average, with this method before it starts to turn brown on the edges.

The middle will still stay green, and while the edges might have turned a little brown if you didn’t seal it well enough, it’s still perfectly safe to eat. Just remember each time you eat from the dish to keep the top of the guacamole level and covered with the plastic wrap touching the top of the guacamole and the sides of the dish, sealing it so no air can get in before you refrigerate.

  • How do you keep your guacamole looking and tasting fresh?
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Comments

  1. says

    Great tip! The misconception of leaving the pits in the guacamole has always made laugh. The secret is keeping it from coming in contact with air. Beautiful guacamole!

    • says

      Thanks, Ben. I never knew where the idea about the pits came from either, but it has never really served me. The pit will only keep the guacamole directly around it green, it seems, because it’s not really limiting the oxygen hitting the avocado. Citrus (lime juice) does help delay the color change a bit because of its acidity, but it can’t do all the work. Refrigerating it and keeping the oxygen out gives it the most mileage whether you plan to serve it the next day or are just protecting leftovers.

  2. Kristina says

    So, this might sound weird, but we add olive oil to keep our guacamole green. My husband first saw a Spanish woman do this, and we thought, of course, that she didn’t know any better. However, we have discovered that it keeps the guacamole green without having to be so careful about protecting from air!

  3. Elizabeth Rangel says

    Love the guacamole tips and I’ve watched my mom in law do the whole pit and lime juice thing. Secrets from the best chefs in the worlds, previous generations…buen provecho!

  4. Cartwright says

    Food saver. Vacuum sealed you can keep guacamole green for a week! Apples too. Figured this out when I decided to vacuum seal everything in the kitchen at least once.

  5. karen acosta says

    I would like to know if theres any other product that can preserve it for a month besides vacuum freezer bags. I’D LIKE TO MAKE IT AND STORE IN A JAR FOR AT LEAST A MONTH.

    THANK YOU

    • says

      Karen, aside from a vacuum bag such as a Foodsaver, which can be used in the refrigerator or freezer, I don’t know of any other product for keeping something like guacamole airtight. I also wouldn’t recommend keeping the same batch of guacamole for an entire month. Your best bet is to make small batches more than once a month to enjoy guacamole so that it’s fresh. The other ingredients in guacamole, such as fresh, diced tomato, won’t keep that long. You can always adjust the portions for recipes so you make a much smaller recipe. I often take a single avocado in my lunchbox and mash it up with lime juice, a little diced onion, tomato and chile serrano, with a sprinkle of salt to eat with my lunch.

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