Nieve de piña con chamoy

Whether you call it a nieve de piña, a raspado de piña or a chamoyada de piña, it doesn’t matter much. They’re all equally refreshing on a hot day and I’ve included directions for them all, made two ways!

How to make a nieve de piña con chamoy with a Yonanas machine or a blender. Recipe via

Nieves and raspados are more or less the same: flavored shaved ice. And chamoyadas are in the same family, but made a little differently; usually they’re a slushy consistency and you drink them with a straw. I’ve included the directions for both below.


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Mangonada popsicles

If you love a traditional Mexican mangonada, then you’ll love this spin on the classic recipe: mangonada popsicles!

Turn the classic Mexican street treat known as a mangonada into popsicles with mango, orange juice, lime, chamoy and Tajín! Recipe via

The mangonada is a quintessential Mexican treat made with mango, orange juice, chamoy and Tajín and it’s a popular snack or dessert with street vendors and neverías (ice cream shops) in Mexico. The sweetness of the mango and orange juice is contrasted by the sourness of the chamoy, and together they make a perfect marriage of what’s known as an “agridulce” (sweet and sour) flavor. Agridulce candies and treats, such as tamarindo con chile, are common and beloved all over the country.

RELATED RECIPE: Mango cantaloupe popsicles with chile powder

I’ve used store-bought liquid chamoy in this recipe because it has a very fluid, runny consistency that perfectly drips down into the mold to give the popsicles the marbled look.

Liquid chamoy is available in most Mexican and Latin American markets in the U.S., usually found near the bottled salsas such as Valentina, Cholula and Tapatío. You can pour the chamoy around the rim of each mold to get it to drip down as directed in the recipe below, or you can put the chamoy in a small plastic chef’s squeeze bottle if you want more control.

The real variable in this recipe, though, is how much Tajín you sprinkle on top! The more Tajín you use, the more sour and salty flavor you’ll get. If you haven’t had a mangonada before, I’d recommend that you start with just a pinch of Tajín sprinkled on top in case the salty-sour experience isn’t really your thing.

RELATED RECIPE: Frozen orange slices with Tajín


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How to make mangonadas

Mangonada #recipe with homemade chamoy from #mexican #flavorstory @mccormickspice

This post is part of a compensated campaign with McCormick & Company but the recipe and opinions here are my own.

A mangonada is a quintessential Mexican treat, made of mango, orange juice, chamoy and chile lime salt, and they’re sold just about everywhere from street vendors to neverías in Mexico.

It’s very popular, especially in the warm weather months, as it resembles an American slushie. You can grab one to go on the street or enjoy it with friends in an ice cream parlor…. 

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Mangonada paletas with a Zoku Quick Pop Maker

Paletas are a serious weakness of mine. All summer, I’ve been testing dozens of flavors and the hardest part is always waiting for them to freeze. That’s why when several friends were telling me about the Zoku Quick Pop Maker, I knew I had to get one. Make single-serve popsicles with three different flavors at once? A dream. Do it in 7-10 minutes? Even better! I’ve been playing with it all summer and I’m finally ready to start sharing some of my tasty creations using this fun kitchen tool.

This post includes affiliate links to all the products used to make this recipe, which are available in El Mercadito, my Amazon aStore.

mangonada (mango and chamoy) paletas

I’ve been experimenting with so many flavors, that I wanted to try something very classic and simple, similar to my mango con chile paletas recipe that I shared here a few summers ago. I can’t seem to eat enough mango this year, and I brought back a bottle of chamoy from Mexico when we visited earlier this summer. This recipe is similar to a mangonada or chamoyada, just blended together and frozen in paleta-form—but you’ll definitely recognize this classic Mexican flavor combination. I’ve started calling my Mexi popsicles made in my Zoku machine “Zokuletas” (insert cheesy grin here). Let’s see if we can make it catch on!… 

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