The Other Side of the Tortilla http://theothersideofthetortilla.com Mexican recipes, culture and travel destinations Thu, 03 Dec 2015 19:43:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Mexican chicken soup with hominy and barley http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/11/mexican-chicken-soup-recipe-hominy-and-barley/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/11/mexican-chicken-soup-recipe-hominy-and-barley/#comments Wed, 04 Nov 2015 22:42:56 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7515 Nothing soothes the soul like chicken soup, no matter what country or culture you identify with. My version of Mexican chicken soup includes hominy and barley for a unique spin on this typical dish. This post is part of a compensated campaign with Teasdale Foods. All opinions and the recipe here are my own. RELATED RECIPE:... 

Read More »

The post Mexican chicken soup with hominy and barley appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
Nothing soothes the soul like chicken soup, no matter what country or culture you identify with. My version of Mexican chicken soup includes hominy and barley for a unique spin on this typical dish.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Teasdale Foods. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Make this hearty Mexican chicken soup with carrots, onion, Mexican oregano, chayote, hominy, barley and finish the flavor with lime juice and chile powder! Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

RELATED RECIPE: Slow-cooker pozole rojo

My suegro loves the sopa de pollo from this place in Mexico City called el Ricón de la Lechuza, which has been around since 1971. What makes La Lechuza’s chicken soup different than most others is that in addition to the traditional homemade broth, carrots and celery, barley (called “cebada” in Spanish) lends a unique texture and adds to the nutritional profile of the dish.

This recipe is my own personal spin on this classic Mexican sopa de pollo with two changes to make it a heartier soup: I’ve added chayote in place of celery (because my husband hates celery) and hominy to give the soup more substantial body so it’s filling enough to be eaten as a meal. The hominy has a nutty and slightly sweet flavor that balances well with the nutty barley, Mexican oregano, and savory broth.

Hominy would also be great added to soups like sopa de poro y papa (a broth soup flavored with leeks and potato) or a tomato chipotle broth to give it more substance.

I always garnish this Mexican chicken soup with a fresh squeeze of lime juice and chile powder for a little kick, such as ground chile piquin, ground chile ancho, Tajín Sazón (which is meant especially for sprinkling into soups) or regular Tajín.

RELATED RECIPE: Sopa de fideo

If you like your chicken soup to be a bit more herby, you can add more Mexican oregano. I was a bit conservative with the amount I added so as not to overpower the rest of the flavors. But you do want to be sure to use Mexican oregano and not the traditional Mediterranean oregano that you typically can find in the grocery store. Mediterranean oregano that is also sometimes known as Italian, Turkish or Greek oregano, is sweeter and not interchangeable in Mexican cooking. Mexican oregano has a distinct, robust flavor with a more floral aroma and citrusy notes that enhance the flavor of chiles — which is why this dish is garnished with chile power or Tajín.

I’ve used a pressure cooker to cut down the time it takes to make this soup so you can make it from start to finish and serve in less than an hour; if you don’t have a pressure cooker, you can cook it in a regular stock pot on the stovetop and increase the cooking time by about 30 minutes. Reserve the chayote and hominy for the last 15 minutes of cooking so they don’t get mushy.

Mexican chicken soup with hominy and barley

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 6 servings

Mexican chicken soup with hominy and barley

Make this hearty Mexican sopa de pollo with carrots, onion, Mexican oregano, chayote, hominy, barley and finish the flavor with lime juice and a sprinkle of chile powder! Mexican chicken soup for everyone!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts
  • 8 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup pearl barley
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Knorr Suiza powdered chicken buillon
  • 1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
  • 1 large clove of garlic, peeled and cut in half
  • 1/4-inch thick slice of a medium white onion
  • 1 large carrot, diced into bite-sized pieces
  • 1/2 a large chayote, skinned, seed removed and diced
  • 1 1/2 cups Teasdale Mexican Style Hominy or White Hominy
  • GARNISHES: fresh limes, chile powder (such as ground chile piquin or chile ancho) or Tajín Sazón/Tajín

Instructions

  1. In a pressure cooker (or stock pot), add chicken breasts, 8 cups water and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt. Rinse 1/2 cup pearl barley in a colander under cool water and add to the pot. Seal the pressure cooker and bring to a boil over high heat until the safety seal lock engages (about 5 minutes), then reduce to medium heat until the pressure gauge gently rocks to let steam escape.
  2. Cook for 15 minutes, then remove from heat, allow steam to escape to disengage the safety lock, and open the pot carefully with potholders, opening the lid facing away from you.
  3. Add 1 1/2 tablespoons Knorr Suiza powdered chicken buillon, 1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano, 1 garlic clove, one 1/4-inch thick slice of white onion and the diced carrot to the pot. Seal the pressure cooker back up, bring to a boil over high heat to engage the safety lock, turn down to medium heat, and cook for another 15 minutes.
  4. While you wait, skin and dice the chayote and set aside. Measure 1 1/2 cups hominy and also set aside.
  5. Remove from heat and allow the steam to escape to disengage the safety lock again. Open the pressure cooker with potholders, with the lid facing away from you. Add the chayote and hominy and seal the pressure cooker and cook on medium-high heat for another 10 minutes.
  6. Remove from heat, allow steam to escape to disengage the safety lock, and open the lid with potholders, with the lid facing away from you as you open. Remove the chicken breasts with a slotted spoon and transfer to a cutting board. Use forks to shred the chicken, discard the bones and return the shredded chicken to the soup.
  7. Serve immediately with fresh limes to squeeze into the soup and optional chile powder.

Notes

To make this recipe on the stovetop in a normal stockpot, add all ingredients except the carrot, chayote and hominy, to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to medium heat for 40-45 minutes, add the diced carrot and cook for another 10 minutes, then add the chayote and hominy, turn the heat to medium-low and cook for another 10-15 minutes.

http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/11/mexican-chicken-soup-recipe-hominy-and-barley/

RELATED RECIPE: Crema de elote soup

WIN A PRIZE PACK FROM TEASDALE FOODS TO MAKE YOUR OWN DELICIOUS CREATIONS IN YOUR KITCHEN!

Click here to view this promotion.

How to make the best Mexican chicken soup with  carrots, onion, Mexican oregano, chayote, hominy, barley and finish the flavor with lime juice and chile powder! Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

RELATED RECIPE: Black bean chipotle soup

 

The post Mexican chicken soup with hominy and barley appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/11/mexican-chicken-soup-recipe-hominy-and-barley/feed/ 2
Slow-cooker pozole rojo http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/10/slow-cooker-pozole-rojo-recipe/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/10/slow-cooker-pozole-rojo-recipe/#comments Thu, 01 Oct 2015 15:26:04 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7492 Pozole rojo is a hearty classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It’s a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine. This post is part of a compensated campaign with... 

Read More »

The post Slow-cooker pozole rojo appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
Pozole rojo is a hearty classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It’s a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Teasdale Foods. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Pozole rojo is a hearty classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It's a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine. Here's how to make pozole rojo in your slow-cooker with a semi-homemade cheat via theothersideofthetortilla.com.

I admit that pozole can be an intimidating dish to make at home, mostly because making the perfect pork broth can be tough to match when you’re up against the memory of a beloved family member’s recipe. But I’ve found an awesome semi-homemade cheat for pozole that’s simple to prepare and easy to love!

I’ve used Teasdale’s new Easy Prep Spicy Red Pozole in this recipe, which is basically just cheating at the broth and hominy preparation—the two factors that often scare people away from making this traditional dish at home if they don’t have a trusted family recipe.

What’s great about it also is that you can choose what kind of meat you want to add; I’ve chosen boneless country pork ribs because they’re easy to find, usually have a mix of dark and light meat, and they cook to tender perfection in a slow-cooker. Nothing beats low and slow, especially when there’s minimal effort involved. The majority of the prep time for this recipe is for slicing and dicing your garnishes. I’ve also doctored the pozole to my personal taste by cooking the pork with bay leaves and Mexican oregano, and adding more chiles to the broth. The slow-cooker also means that most of the cooking is hands-off so you can be doing something else!

RELATED RECIPE: Slow-cooker carnitas

Pozole is a prehispanic dish that has been enjoyed in Mexico for many generations dating at least all the way back to the times of Moctezuma in the latter part of the 1400s, and the preparation still used and served today goes back to the 18th Century, according to culinary historians. The three main types of pozole you’ll find all throughout Mexico are pozole blanco, pozole verde and pozole rojo. In Mexico City, where our family is from, you can find many varieties of the three typical colors of pozole served all over the city, including more than a dozen regional varieties from all over the country. And, they can have pork, chicken, shrimp, or be vegetarian-friendly, too. You can find pozole served everywhere from dedicated pozolerías to markets, fondas and even some high-end restaurants that serve traditional Mexican cuisine.

Traditional garnishes with pozole include sliced radishes, diced white onion, shredded iceberg lettuce or cabbage, chopped cilantro, fresh limes, dried Mexican oregano and chile powder, such as ground chile piquin. In Mexico City, it’s very common to serve pozole with tostadas with crema mexicana spread on top, which is to be eaten alternating with a spoonful of pozole, then a bite of tostada.

Whether you love red, green or white #pozole, this traditional #Mexican dish is always fun to eat! Pozole is a hearty soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, #hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. But there are also lots of regional variations of this prehispanic dish, which is popular all over #Mexico and is a staple of the cuisine. Check out my version using a #slowcooker and an awesome cheat that's simple to prepare and easy to love! (Don't forget the tostadas and crema on the side!) 😉 🐷🍲<img src=🇽" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> #Recipe on theothersideofthetortilla.com! #teasdalefoods #ad #mexicanfood #comidamexicana #cdmx #chilango #pozolerojo #instavideo #instafood #instagood #instamex #stopmotion #food #hungry #soup #mydayinLA #fall #crockpot #crockpotcooking #pozoleando #pozolefordays #sopa #sopita

A video posted by Maura Hernandez (@maurahernandez) on

This recipe is most similar to Jalisco-style red pozole, and I’ve added a few extra ancho chiles to the broth for a deeper chile flavor. I like my red pozole fairly spicy, but you can leave them out if you’re not accustomed to spicy pozole. But if you do want to incorporate more heat, you can also puree the extra chiles with a little broth once hydrated, then strain them into the soup, or just add a sprinkle of ground chile piquin when serving.

Take care not to overcook the hominy, as it can become mushy. (When in doubt, you can always remove the hominy a little early and put it on the side while your broth is still cooking in the slow-cooker. You’ll know the hominy is done when it looked bloomed or fluffy.) Pozole reheats well and can also be frozen. If the broth is thicker than you’d like, you can also thin it out with a bit of chicken broth.

Do you like pozole rojo or pozole blanco better? Let me know why in the comments!

RELATED RECIPE: Frijol con puerco

Slow-cooker pozole rojo

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 4 hours, 30 minutes

Total Time: 5 hours

Yield: 6-8 servings

Slow-cooker pozole rojo

Pozole rojo is a classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It's a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds boneless country pork ribs (preferably with some dark meat and either a little fat marble or visible fat)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 large or two medium bay leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
  • 1 can (108 ounces) of Teasdale Easy Prep Spicy Red Pozole
  • 2 ancho chiles, stem and seeds removed
  • Traditional garnishes: Sliced radishes, shredded iceberg lettuce, diced white onion, chopped cilantro, lime juice, ground chile piquin or ground chile ancho

Instructions

  1. Place the bay leaf or leaves on the bottom of the slow cooker.
  2. Arrange the boneless country pork ribs on their sides, covering up the bay leaf, and cover the bottom of the slow cooker.
  3. Sprinkle kosher salt and Mexican oregano over the meat. Cover the slow cooker and turn on low heat. Cook for 2 hours, turn meat, and cook for 1 more hour.
  4. After the third hour, open the can of Teasdale Easy Prep and pour the liquid in first. Spoon the hominy over the top and even out so everything is covered by broth.
  5. Turn slow cooker to high heat and cook for 1.5 to 2 hours, until the broth comes to a boil. Remove lid, turn off heat (or turn slow cooker to keep warm setting) and ladle into bowls.
  6. Garnish with a squeeze of lime juice, sliced radishes, shredded iceberg lettuce or cabbage, diced white onion, chopped cilantro, and a sprinkle of Mexican oregano and ground chile piquin or ancho (optional).

Notes

Serve with tostadas and crema mexicana.

http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/10/slow-cooker-pozole-rojo-recipe/

RELATED RECIPE: Slow-cooker cochinita pibil

FOR READERS IN CALIFORNIA: From September 28-November 9, you can register for a chance to win 4 tickets to Disneyland plus a $500 Visa gift card from Teasdale! Register in participating stores or enter online in English/enter online in Spanish. No purchase necessary. Please visit Teasdale Hominy Disneyland Sweepstakes site for official rules.

Teasdale Disneyland Sweepstakes, September 28-November 9, 2015

The post Slow-cooker pozole rojo appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/10/slow-cooker-pozole-rojo-recipe/feed/ 1
Nieve de piña con chamoy http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/09/nieve-de-pina-con-chamoy-recipe/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/09/nieve-de-pina-con-chamoy-recipe/#comments Mon, 21 Sep 2015 07:01:34 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7478 Whether you call it a nieve de piña, a raspado de piña or a chamoyada de piña, it doesn’t matter much. They’re all equally refreshing on a hot day and I’ve included directions for them all, made two ways! Nieves and raspados are more or less the same: flavored shaved ice. And chamoyadas are in the same... 

Read More »

The post Nieve de piña con chamoy appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
Whether you call it a nieve de piña, a raspado de piña or a chamoyada de piña, it doesn’t matter much. They’re all equally refreshing on a hot day and I’ve included directions for them all, made two ways!

How to make a nieve de piña con chamoy with a Yonanas machine or a blender. Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

Nieves and raspados are more or less the same: flavored shaved ice. And chamoyadas are in the same family, but made a little differently; usually they’re a slushy consistency and you drink them with a straw. I’ve included the directions for both below.

It’s been awfully hot in Los Angeles in recent weeks and I’ve been looking for ways to keep cool without heating up the kitchen. I recently saw a photo on Instagram of a Chamoy Dole Whip at an Italian ice joint in Orange County (read: way too far for me to go just for ice cream). So I started to think… How could I make my own version of this amazing treat at home? Enter my Yonanas machine.

I love making quick frozen desserts with my Yonanas machine (that’s an affiliate link to my store), which makes soft-serve ice cream from frozen fruit. You don’t have to spend hours messing with a machine that has to have a frozen bowl like you do with an ice cream maker (because let’s be honest, when you want ice cream, you want it right away, not tomorrow). You just put the frozen fruit directly down the chute, and out comes the soft serve! It’s a great way to cut calories at dessert time as well since you don’t need to add any sugar or other ingredients to make it come out like a fancy sorbet. You can even blend different fruits together to make new flavors. (If I was going to use two fruits in this recipe, I’d use pineapple and mango.)

Plus, making your own fresh fruit soft serve with a Yonanas machine is a really easy way to ensure that your dessert is gluten-free and vegan-friendly if you have dietary restrictions.

If you don’t have a Yonanas machine, you can absolutely make this in your blender but you’ll need to add a little bit of liquid to help the pineapple blend without burning out your motor. I recommend pineapple juice, which I’ve included in the recipe below. If you want to make it more like a chamoyada, you can triple or quadruple the amount of pineapple juice until you get a consistency you like. Don’t forget to pour chamoy around the edge of your glass, a little at the bottom and then some more on top! I’ve been known to get a little crazy with my Tajín, so whether you like a little or a lot, it’s really up to you.

TIP: I buy frozen pineapple tidbits at Trader Joe’s in the freezer section, but you can also cut your own pineapple and freeze it, or use canned pineapple and freeze on a baking sheet (just reserve the juice in the fridge for later).

RELATED RECIPE: How to make a mangonada

Nieve de piña con chamoy

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

3/4 cup

Nieve de piña con chamoy

Ingredients

  • 2.5 cups frozen pineapple tidbits
  • 1/4 cup chamoy, or more to taste
  • Tajín, to taste
  • If using a blender: add 1/4 cup pineapple juice

Instructions

  1. With a Yonanas machine: Load the Yonanas chute with frozen pineapple 1/2 cup at a time. Place a bowl below the chute, turn on the machine and push down with plunger. Repeat with every half-cup until you run out.
  2. With a blender: Add frozen pineapple tidbits and pineapple juice to blender. Blend on high until completely smooth. If needed, pour into a container and freeze for an additional 15-20 minutes before serving.
  3. Coat small ice cream dish or bowl with chamoy around the sides to allow it to drip down, as well as a little on the bottom of the dish.
  4. Scoop pineapple ice into the dish over the chamoy. Drizzle remaining chamoy over the top of the pineapple ice.
  5. Sprinkle Tajín over the top, to taste.
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/09/nieve-de-pina-con-chamoy-recipe/

RELATED RECIPE: Mangonada popsicles

The post Nieve de piña con chamoy appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/09/nieve-de-pina-con-chamoy-recipe/feed/ 2
Mangonada popsicles http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mangonada-popsicles/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mangonada-popsicles/#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 05:51:46 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7433 If you love a traditional Mexican mangonada, then you’ll love this spin on the classic recipe: mangonada popsicles! The mangonada is a quintessential Mexican treat made with mango, orange juice, chamoy and Tajín and it’s a popular snack or dessert with street vendors and neverías (ice cream shops) in Mexico. The sweetness of the mango and... 

Read More »

The post Mangonada popsicles appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
If you love a traditional Mexican mangonada, then you’ll love this spin on the classic recipe: mangonada popsicles!

Turn the classic Mexican street treat known as a mangonada into popsicles with mango, orange juice, lime, chamoy and Tajín! Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

The mangonada is a quintessential Mexican treat made with mango, orange juice, chamoy and Tajín and it’s a popular snack or dessert with street vendors and neverías (ice cream shops) in Mexico. The sweetness of the mango and orange juice is contrasted by the sourness of the chamoy, and together they make a perfect marriage of what’s known as an “agridulce” (sweet and sour) flavor. Agridulce candies and treats, such as tamarindo con chile, are common and beloved all over the country.

RELATED RECIPE: Mango cantaloupe popsicles with chile powder

I’ve used store-bought liquid chamoy in this recipe because it has a very fluid, runny consistency that perfectly drips down into the mold to give the popsicles the marbled look.

Liquid chamoy is available in most Mexican and Latin American markets in the U.S., usually found near the bottled salsas such as Valentina, Cholula and Tapatío. You can pour the chamoy around the rim of each mold to get it to drip down as directed in the recipe below, or you can put the chamoy in a small plastic chef’s squeeze bottle if you want more control.

The real variable in this recipe, though, is how much Tajín you sprinkle on top! The more Tajín you use, the more sour and salty flavor you’ll get. If you haven’t had a mangonada before, I’d recommend that you start with just a pinch of Tajín sprinkled on top in case the salty-sour experience isn’t really your thing.

RELATED RECIPE: Frozen orange slices with Tajín

If you prefer not to use store-bought chamoy, here’s my recipe for homemade chamoy, which is thicker than the store-bought variety and needs to be slightly more liquidy for it to drip down the popsicle molds properly. You can achieve a similar effect by using a spoon to smear the inside of the popsicle mold if you want to make your own chamoy from scratch with my recipe.

I’ve used a Norpro Ice Pop Maker popsicle mold to make these paletas, which makes 10 three-ounce popsicles and holds the sticks perfectly in place while in the freezer. (That’s an affiliate link to my Amazon store, El Mercadito.)

RELATED RECIPE: Street food-style mango cups

Mangonada popsicles

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 8 hours

Total Time: 8 hours, 15 minutes

Yield: 10 3-ounce popsicles

1 popsicle

Mangonada popsicles

Make this fun spin on a traditional Mexican mangonada by adapting the recipe for your favorite popsicle mold!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh-squeezed orange juice (about 4 large Valencia oranges)
  • juice of 1/2 a medium lime
  • 2 1/2 cups frozen mango chunks
  • 1/3 cup store-bought liquid chamoy
  • Tajín, to taste

Instructions

  1. Juice the oranges and lime.
  2. In a blender, add orange juice, lime juice and frozen mango chunks. Blend on high until completely smooth. Set aside.
  3. Measure out 1/3 cup chamoy. Pour a little chamoy (a few teaspoons) around the edges of each popsicle mold, allowing chamoy to drip down the sides and pool a little bit in the bottom of the mold.
  4. Pour the mango mixture down the center of each mold, being careful not to let it disturb the chamoy dripping down the inside of the mold.
  5. Put the top on the mold, add popsicle sticks and freeze for at least 8 hours.
  6. To remove from mold, gently run lukewarm water over the bottom of the mold (opposite the sticks) to loosen the popsicles.
  7. Sprinkle with Tajín to taste, or pour Tajín on a small plate and dip the tips of each popsicle in a little Tajín and serve.

Notes

Cook time listed is for time needed to freeze the popsicles.

http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mangonada-popsicles/

RELATED RECIPE: Mango and chamoy popsicles for a Zoku Quick Pop Maker

The post Mangonada popsicles appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mangonada-popsicles/feed/ 2
A night out with Cerveza Montejo http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/night-out-cerveza-montejo-dodger-stadium/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/night-out-cerveza-montejo-dodger-stadium/#comments Sat, 11 Jul 2015 06:54:10 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7404 This post is part of a compensated campaign with Montejo. All opinions are my own. I had never eaten dinner on the field of a Major League Baseball park, so when Montejo, a Mexican beer company I adore, invited me to have dinner on the field at Dodger Stadium — with a Mexican-inspired dinner cooked... 

Read More »

The post A night out with Cerveza Montejo appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
This post is part of a compensated campaign with Montejo. All opinions are my own.

I had never eaten dinner on the field of a Major League Baseball park, so when Montejo, a Mexican beer company I adore, invited me to have dinner on the field at Dodger Stadium — with a Mexican-inspired dinner cooked up by Chef Eduardo Ruiz of LA’s Corazón y Miel — I knew it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. We are big baseball lovers in our household, so I knew I would have a great time even though the Dodgers are not my home team.

Cerveza Montejo is a golden lager beer that has been brewed for more than 100 years in Mexico.

Dodger Stadium private dinner with Montejo - more on theothersideofthetortilla.com

Named after Don Francisco de Montejo, the founder of the city of Mérida in the state of Yucatán, Cerveza Montejo was originally brewed at the Cervecería Yucateca beginning in 1900, and is now brewed in Tuxtepec, in the state of Oaxaca, by Cervecería Modelo. Although this tasty Mexican beer has been around for a long time in Mexico, it has only been available in select states in the U.S. since September 2014. As a newer beer to the American market, it was cool to learn that Montejo is an official beer sponsor for the L.A. Dodgers and the Texas Rangers. If you’ve been to other ballparks in California, Arizona or Texas, you’ve also probably seen Montejo sold at the concession stands. And at Dodger Stadium, they even have a Montejo bar behind the right field pavilion!

We’ve had Montejo plenty of times in Mexico, so I’m excited to have it available in the U.S. because not only is it good for drinking plain and making micheladas, it’s also a great beer for cooking — especially when it comes to marinating and tenderizing meats for summer grilling!

RELATED RECIPE: Arrachera borracha

The dinner

I was joined by about 100 friends (old and new) for a tour of the stadium, followed by a dinner where every course included Montejo Mexican beer as an ingredient. Some dishes disappeared more quickly than others, but here are some of my favorites from the night.

We kicked off the evening with Montejoladas (the cute name they came up with for micheladas made with Montejo beer) at the stadium entrance, tailgate-style. If you’ve never had a michelada before, it usually consists of beer, tomato juice (or Clamato), freshly-squeezed lime juice, salsa Maggi and/or Worcestershire sauce, and sometimes even some hot sauce. It’s similar to a Bloody Mary, but made with beer. This particular version was a peppery, spicy one that was garnished with a lime and a pickled green bean, which I have never had in a michelada before, but was tasty!

A michelada made with cerveza Montejo - more details at theothersideofthetortilla.com

We arrived on the field to a long table, simply but beautifully set with flowers and menus.

Dinner menu for a private dinner party with Montejo at Dodger Stadium  - Details at theothersideofthetortilla.com

As we were arriving and being seated for dinner on the field of Dodger Stadium, we were serenaded by a mariachi band!

No big deal. Just hanging out with a mariachi band at Dodger Stadium and having dinner with @CervezaMontejo and 100 friends! #VivaMontejo #sponsored

Posted by The Other Side of The Tortilla on Monday, June 29, 2015

This chorizo escalfado (poached in Montejo) with mushrooms, panela and Oaxaca cheeses, and topped with chopped scallions, cilantro and edible flower petals was definitely one of the stars of the night! The consistency of this locally made chorizo was similar to a morcilla, so it was heartier and more solid than your typical Mexican chorizo.

A unique queso fundido with muuhrooms, panela and Oaxaca cheeses, and chorizo cooked with Montejo Mexican beer - more details at theothersideofthetortilla.com

This sandwich, called an hongo adobado, was a marinated portobello mushroom with a barbecue sauce made with Montejo beer, a cauliflower cole slaw-like topping with a spicy remoulade and served on a brioche bun.

An adobado-marinated portobello mushroom sandwich with a barbecue salsa made with Montejo Mexican beer - more details at theothersideofthetortilla.com

The next item on the menu was, gallina embriagada, a Montejo beer-brined hen served with caramelized parsnips and crunchy pea tendrils. I may or may not have embarrassed myself a little at the table while trying to separate a leg and a thigh to share with a friend. We discovered it wasn’t coming apart in a nice way with a fork and knife, so we got a little un-ladylike and just used our hands. Worth it!

Gallina embriagada, a beer-brined hen served with caramelized parsnips and pea tendrils - more at theothersideofthetortilla.com

We also ate an amazing, juicy steak marinated in Montejo and served with a chimichurri sauce, sunchokes and roasted potatoes. But that disappeared before I was able to snap a picture, so you’ll just have to imagine it.

And then finally, we ended with an incredible dessert — a banana-filled cinnamon sugar buñuelo with a caramel sauce made with Montejo!

Banana and crunchy cinnamon sugar buñuelo, drizzled with Montejo caramel sauce - more details on theothersideofthetortilla.com

Thanks to Montejo for the invite and to Chef Ruiz for showing us all the creative ways to use Montejo Mexican beer in recipes! For more fun photos and videos from our night out at Dodger Stadium, check out #VivaMontejo on Instagram!

If you’d like to try Montejo, you can currently get it in the following states: California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Florida, Colorado, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, Illinois, North Carolina and South Carolina (and more states coming soon).

Here’s what to look for in your grocery or liquor store:

Cerveza Montejo - Mexican lager beer - more details on theothersideofthetortilla.com

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Montejo. The opinions and text are all mine.

The post A night out with Cerveza Montejo appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/night-out-cerveza-montejo-dodger-stadium/feed/ 1
Frozen orange slices with Tajín http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/frozen-orange-slices-tajin-recipe/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/frozen-orange-slices-tajin-recipe/#comments Tue, 07 Jul 2015 04:39:38 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7387 Transform plain orange slices with a little lime juice and Tajín! Serve immediately, or freeze them for a refreshing, frosty treat! The best part of summer is the peak availability of so many fruits; it means you can make a variety of sweet treats with little or no added sugar, such as street food-style mango... 

Read More »

The post Frozen orange slices with Tajín appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
Transform plain orange slices with a little lime juice and Tajín! Serve immediately, or freeze them for a refreshing, frosty treat!

Healthy snack: Valencia oranges with lime juice and Tajín - A gluten-free, vegan-friendly recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

The best part of summer is the peak availability of so many fruits; it means you can make a variety of sweet treats with little or no added sugar, such as street food-style mango and orange cups with coconut chips, watermelon aloe juice, and all kinds of paletas. With what seems like a surplus of juicy oranges at my local supermarkets, I’ve been using them in many different ways all summer. Whether it’s juicing them, eating them plain, or sectioning them to make a fruity pico de gallo or ensalada xec (a Mayan citrus and jicama salad), there are lots of possibilities.

This healthy snack is one I like to make in advance, freeze and serve by the pool or in the backyard on hot summer days. It’s great to serve to kids as well because even if they eat two servings, they’re eating only one whole orange. Plus, it’s an easy snack for little hands to hold.

RELATED RECIPE: Mango cantaloupe paletas with chile powder

This recipe is gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan-friendly.

Bonus: If you cut a slit in the middle of the orange slices before you freeze them, you can also use them as a cocktail garnish or float them on top of a cocktail instead of an ice cube! They’d go great with a mangonada blended with a little tequila, any citrusy margarita or even as a garnish alongside a caballito of tequila.

Healthy snack: Valencia oranges with lime juice and Tajín - A gluten-free, vegan-friendly recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

RELATED RECIPE: Pineapple cucumber lime paletas

Orange slices with lime and Tajín

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

5 half moon slices each

Orange slices with lime and Tajín

A gluten-free, vegan-friendly healthy snack: Valencia oranges with lime juice and Tajín

Ingredients

  • 2 large Valencia oranges, sliced (should yield about 20 half-moon slices)
  • Juice of half a large lime
  • Tajín or chile lime salt (about 1/4 teaspoon per half-moon slice)

Instructions

  1. Slice the oranges and cut each slice in half. Arrange on a lined baking sheet or tray that will fit in your freezer.
  2. Squeeze the juice of half a large lime over the orange slices. If you like, you can squeeze the lime juice into a small dish and use a pastry brush to evenly apply the lime juice.
  3. Sprinkle the Tajín liberally over the orange slices.
  4. Serve immediately or freeze for at least 30 minutes for a frosty sweet and spicy treat.

Notes

Cook time listed is for freezing time.

http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/frozen-orange-slices-tajin-recipe/

RELATED RECIPE: Vegan banana chia popsicles

The post Frozen orange slices with Tajín appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/frozen-orange-slices-tajin-recipe/feed/ 1
Mexican S’mores http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mexican-smores-recipe/ http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mexican-smores-recipe/#respond Fri, 03 Jul 2015 04:34:52 +0000 http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/?p=7369 Mexican s’mores are an easy twist on a classic American treat, made with grated Mexican chocolate melted into mini discs. This post is part of a compensated campaign with Honey Maid. All opinions and the recipe here are my own. One in five Americans is part of an immigrant family and I’m among them. Although... 

Read More »

The post Mexican S’mores appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
Mexican s’mores are an easy twist on a classic American treat, made with grated Mexican chocolate melted into mini discs.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Honey Maid. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

How to make Mexican chocolate s'mores : Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

One in five Americans is part of an immigrant family and I’m among them. Although I was born and raised in the United States, my husband was born and raised in Mexico City. So when it comes to celebrating American holidays, such as the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving, I like to put some Mexican touches on our celebrations — both in the menu and the decorations. It’s important to me that we talk about and celebrate both cultures in our home. I know that someday, our kids will appreciate having been raised in a bicultural, bilingual household because it will give them the best of both worlds.

Most years, we celebrate the Fourth of July with my family in the U.S. It’s a day filled with family fun by the pool, snacks, a barbecue dinner (including dishes such as grilled Mexican chimichurri-marinated flank steak, arrachera borracha, tacos de rib eye and cebollitas), dessert and a fireworks display or at least some sparklers to conclude our Independence Day festivities. Any regular reader of my blog can attest that I love to put a Mexican spin on my favorite American dishes, so it’s probably no surprise that I’d do the same for my Fourth of July dessert pick: s’mores. Although I keep regular milk chocolate on hand to make traditional s’mores too, I like to switch things up and also make mini Mexican chocolate discs to sandwich between my Honey Maid graham crackers and fire-toasted marshmallows.

Everyone in my family loves these Mexican s’mores!

The beauty of the melting pot that is America is that there’s not just one correct way to celebrate, and there’s always room for adding your own traditions. Mexican chocolate, made with ground cacao and cacao nibs, granulated sugar and a touch of cinnamon, makes for a unique s’more experience that’s just a little more my style. I like to make the discs in advance and keep them in the freezer for making s’mores all summer long. My next endeavor with my s’mores is to make my own marshmallows, flavored with Mexican vanilla!

Please watch and share this beautiful video from Honey Maid (grab a tissue first), and then join me on social media with the hashtags #MeltingPot and #ThisIsWholesome to share how your family celebrates the Fourth of July with a cultural twist like we do.
Mexican Chocolate S’mores

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

1 s'more

Mexican Chocolate S’mores

Give s'mores a Mexican twist with homemade mini Mexican chocolate discs.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup grated Mexican chocolate (such as Abuelita or Ibarra; about 1 disc)
  • 2 teaspoons water
  • 4 HoneyMaid graham crackers, broken in halves
  • 4-8 large marshmallows

Instructions

  1. Use a cheese grater to grate 1 disc of Mexican chocolate.
  2. In a shallow, microwave-safe bowl, add chocolate and stir in 2 teaspoons of water to moisten.
  3. Microwave the chocolate mixture for 10-15 seconds and stir until completely moistened. Allow to cool for 5 minutes.
  4. On a cookie sheet lined with wax paper or parchment paper, spoon rounded tablespoons of the chocolate onto the paper. Use the spoon to spread the chocolate into a small disc, about 2 1/2 inches in diameter.
  5. Refrigerate the cookie sheet with the chocolate for at least 30 minutes; or freeze for 15 minutes. Store in the refrigerator in an airtight container, with wax or parchment paper separating the chocolate discs until ready to serve.
  6. To assemble: roast marshmallows, place chocolate disc on one graham cracker square, top with marshmallow, and top with the other graham cracker square.
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mexican-smores-recipe/

The post Mexican S’mores appeared first on The Other Side of the Tortilla.

]]>
http://theothersideofthetortilla.com/2015/07/mexican-smores-recipe/feed/ 0