Slow-cooker pozole rojo

Pozole rojo is a hearty classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It’s a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Teasdale Foods. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Pozole rojo is a hearty classic Mexican soup or stew, traditionally made with pork broth, pork, hominy, and spices, then topped with garnishes such as lime juice, radishes, onion, lettuce and more. It's a popular traditional dish served throughout the country that is representative of Mexican cuisine. Here's how to make pozole rojo in your slow-cooker with a semi-homemade cheat via

I admit that pozole can be an intimidating dish to make at home, mostly because making the perfect pork broth can be tough to match when you’re up against the memory of a beloved family member’s recipe. But I’ve found an awesome semi-homemade cheat for pozole that’s simple to prepare and easy to love!


Read More »

Nieve de piña con chamoy

Whether you call it a nieve de piña, a raspado de piña or a chamoyada de piña, it doesn’t matter much. They’re all equally refreshing on a hot day and I’ve included directions for them all, made two ways!

How to make a nieve de piña con chamoy with a Yonanas machine or a blender. Recipe via

Nieves and raspados are more or less the same: flavored shaved ice. And chamoyadas are in the same family, but made a little differently; usually they’re a slushy consistency and you drink them with a straw. I’ve included the directions for both below.


Read More »

Mangonada popsicles

If you love a traditional Mexican mangonada, then you’ll love this spin on the classic recipe: mangonada popsicles!

Turn the classic Mexican street treat known as a mangonada into popsicles with mango, orange juice, lime, chamoy and Tajín! Recipe via

The mangonada is a quintessential Mexican treat made with mango, orange juice, chamoy and Tajín and it’s a popular snack or dessert with street vendors and neverías (ice cream shops) in Mexico. The sweetness of the mango and orange juice is contrasted by the sourness of the chamoy, and together they make a perfect marriage of what’s known as an “agridulce” (sweet and sour) flavor. Agridulce candies and treats, such as tamarindo con chile, are common and beloved all over the country.

RELATED RECIPE: Mango cantaloupe popsicles with chile powder

I’ve used store-bought liquid chamoy in this recipe because it has a very fluid, runny consistency that perfectly drips down into the mold to give the popsicles the marbled look.

Liquid chamoy is available in most Mexican and Latin American markets in the U.S., usually found near the bottled salsas such as Valentina, Cholula and Tapatío. You can pour the chamoy around the rim of each mold to get it to drip down as directed in the recipe below, or you can put the chamoy in a small plastic chef’s squeeze bottle if you want more control.

The real variable in this recipe, though, is how much Tajín you sprinkle on top! The more Tajín you use, the more sour and salty flavor you’ll get. If you haven’t had a mangonada before, I’d recommend that you start with just a pinch of Tajín sprinkled on top in case the salty-sour experience isn’t really your thing.

RELATED RECIPE: Frozen orange slices with Tajín


Read More »

Frozen orange slices with Tajín

Transform plain orange slices with a little lime juice and Tajín! Serve immediately, or freeze them for a refreshing, frosty treat!

Healthy snack: Valencia oranges with lime juice and Tajín - A gluten-free, vegan-friendly recipe via

The best part of summer is the peak availability of so many fruits; it means you can make a variety of sweet treats with little or no added sugar, such as street food-style mango and orange cups with coconut chips, watermelon aloe juice, and all kinds of paletas. With what seems like a surplus of juicy oranges at my local supermarkets, I’ve been using them in many different ways all summer. Whether it’s juicing them, eating them plain, or sectioning them to make a fruity pico de gallo or ensalada xec (a Mayan citrus and jicama salad), there are lots of possibilities.

This healthy snack is one I like to make in advance, freeze and serve by the pool or in the backyard on hot summer days. It’s great to serve to kids as well because even if they eat two servings, they’re eating only one whole orange. Plus, it’s an easy snack for little hands to hold.

RELATED RECIPE: Mango cantaloupe paletas with chile powder

This recipe is gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan-friendly.


Read More »

Mexican S’mores

Mexican s’mores are an easy twist on a classic American treat, made with grated Mexican chocolate melted into mini discs.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Honey Maid. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

How to make Mexican chocolate s'mores : Recipe via

One in five Americans is part of an immigrant family and I’m among them. Although I was born and raised in the United States, my husband was born and raised in Mexico City. So when it comes to celebrating American holidays, such as the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving, I like to put some Mexican touches on our celebrations — both in the menu and the decorations. It’s important to me that we talk about and celebrate both cultures in our home. I know that someday, our kids will appreciate having been raised in a bicultural, bilingual household because it will give them the best of both worlds.

Most years, we celebrate the Fourth of July with my family in the U.S. It’s a day filled with family fun by the pool, snacks, a barbecue dinner (including dishes such as grilled Mexican chimichurri-marinated flank steak, arrachera borracha, tacos de rib eye and cebollitas), dessert and a fireworks display or at least some sparklers to conclude our Independence Day festivities. Any regular reader of my blog can attest that I love to put a Mexican spin on my favorite American dishes, so it’s probably no surprise that I’d do the same for my Fourth of July dessert pick: s’mores. Although I keep regular milk chocolate on hand to make traditional s’mores too, I like to switch things up and also make mini Mexican chocolate discs to sandwich between my Honey Maid graham crackers and fire-toasted marshmallows.

Everyone in my family loves these Mexican s’mores!


Read More »

Vegan banana chia popsicles

These banana chia popsicles are an easy homemade summer treat packed with nutrition and very little added sugar.

How to make banana chia popsicles with banana, chia seeds, coconut milk and a little sugar. This recipe is dairy-free and vegan-friendly! Via

During the summer, I always want paletas for dessert whenever possible because, well, it’s typically REALLY HOT in the part of Los Angeles where we live. I very rarely buy popsicles in the grocery store because they have a lot of added sugar, and if I’m going to be eating them daily, I need to make healthier choices. Plus, I have a reputation to uphold as the queen of paletas!

Whenever I buy too many bananas (which is basically always) and they start to get spots and are too ripe, I have to get creative with how to use them quickly. So I came up with this frozen treat version of a refrigerated banana chia pudding that I like to make when I’m trying to eat healthier. They’re not overly sweet or too banana-y, they’re very low-fat and not many calories per serving either (for the record, one serving is one popsicle). As you probably know, bananas are packed with potassium and Vitamin C as well as fiber and some other nutrients. Most of the sweetness in this recipe comes from the natural sugar in the bananas. Of course, if you like your popsicles on the sweeter side, you can always add a little extra sugar to the recipe if you want.

RELATED RECIPE: Coconut chia pudding


Read More »