Easter egg gelatinas

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Nestlé El Mejor Nido. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Gelatinas are a popular dessert throughout Mexico and come in many unique flavors and shapes.

Of course, no holiday celebration is complete without one of your tías bringing her fanciest gelatina, right? My favorite kind of are the ones with colorful layers!
How to make Easter egg gelatinas with La Lechera sweetened condensed milk. Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com
I was making a list of Easter dessert ideas the other day to bring to my aunt’s house for our family’s celebration and I decided to check out ElMejorNido.com for some inspiration. I love that I can save, organize and rate recipes, as well as make shopping lists and get recipes and special offers delivered my inbox every month. I came across some great ideas and recipes for making gelatinas that sparked a memory…. 

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How to make orejas

Instructions how to make orejas, also known as palmiers. This popular Mexican pan dulce has only three ingredients: puff pastry, cinnamon and sugar. Recipe on theothersideofthetortilla.com.

Orejas, also known as palmiers, are a puff pastry cookie and kind of pan dulce commonly found in panaderías all over Mexico.

Pan dulce was made popular during the French occupation in the mid 1800s, and as Mexican President Porfirio Díaz was considered to be a Francophile, French influence on Mexico’s gastronomy was allowed to grow from the time Díaz first took control as president in 1880 and flourish into the early 1900s.

In 1911, Díaz left Mexico to live in exile in Paris when Madero became president; he would live there for four years before he died in 1915. And although Díaz died in exile, the French pastries and sweet breads adopted by Mexico morphed into uniquely Mexican creations, with a variety of shapes, textures and creative names that still exist today.

RELATED RECIPE: Cafe de olla… 

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Atole de vainilla

How to make Mexican atole de vainilla. Recipe via @MauraHernandez on The Other Side of The Tortilla.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Maseca, but all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Atole de vainilla is a traditional masa-based beverage, often made with milk, and served hot. This hot beverage goes great with tamales, pastries or pan dulce and is also most popular around Day of the Dead and the holidays. 

Atoles date back to pre-Columbian times in Mexico and are well-documented as a form of sustenance amongst the Aztec and Mayan cultures. Historical texts tell us the drink was often flavored with fruits, spices or chiles. 

Vanilla, strawberry and chocolate are the most common flavors of atole nowadays, but you can sometimes also find mora (blackberry; one of my favorites), nuez (pecan), pineapple, elote (sweet corn), piñon (pine nut), and many other flavors. In some areas of Mexico, you can even find savory atoles—one made with with green chile is called chileatole.

RELATED RECIPE: Champurrado… 

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Crepas de cajeta con nueces

How to make crepas de cajeta con nueces. Recipe on theothersideofthetortilla.com via @MauraHernandez.

This is a sponsored post, though all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Crepas de cajeta are a classic Mexican dessert with French influence. Although the French occupation of Mexico in the 1860s was relatively short-lived, French gastronomy had a lasting impact on the country, which is still apparent today in many dishes that are considered part of Mexican gastronomy. Crepas de cajeta con nueces—crepes with goat’s milk caramel and pecans—is a dish frequently served in upscale restaurants in Mexico, though it’s not too difficult to make at home.

It can be a bit laborious to make this dessert completely from scratch, as homemade cajeta can take several hours, but thanks to a few store-bought ingredients, you can whip up the same fancy taste in your own kitchen in about 20 minutes from start to finish…. 

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Mango cantaloupe paletas with chile powder

Mango and cantaloupe are a great combination not only because they’re both at peak availability during the summer, but also because both fruits are sweet enough when ripe that they don’t need to be sweetened with sugar to make juices or other treats like popsicles.

These mango cantaloupe popsicles are keeping me in denial about the end of summer drawing near.

Mango, cantaloupe and chile powder paletas recipe from The Other Side of The Tortilla

I really love these popsicles because they’re not syrupy sweet like store-bought popsicles, and the chile powder in the fruit mixture adds just the right amount of heat so that they’re still kid-friendly. Optionally, if you like, you can also sprinkle or dip the popsicles in some more chile powder before eating to add extra spicy flavor. … 

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Sweet potato flan

Sweet potato flan #recipe from theothersideofthetortilla.com with California Sweetpotatoes #CAbatata

This post is part of a compensated campaign in collaboration with California Sweetpotatoes and Latina Bloggers Connect. All opinions and the recipe are my own.

Sweet potato flan is a non-traditional flavor for a very traditional dessert, but if you’re a sweet potato fan, I guarantee you’ll like this rich, decadent dessert. Mashed sweet potato gives this recipe a more dense, textured quality than your traditional flan.

I like cooking with sweet potatoes because they can be prepared in a variety of ways from savory to sweet. This low-carb and vitamin and mineral-rich vegetable is considered a superfood and one sweet potato contains more than one day’s worth of Vitamin A. My favorite way to eat them is baked and sprinkled with a little chopped piloncillo, ground cinnamon and a little bit of butter, which is what led to the idea to create this flan recipe…. 

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