Vegan banana chia popsicles

These banana chia popsicles are an easy homemade summer treat packed with nutrition and very little added sugar.

How to make banana chia popsicles with banana, chia seeds, coconut milk and a little sugar. This recipe is dairy-free and vegan-friendly! Via theothersideofthetortilla.com

During the summer, I always want paletas for dessert whenever possible because, well, it’s typically REALLY HOT in the part of Los Angeles where we live. I very rarely buy popsicles in the grocery store because they have a lot of added sugar, and if I’m going to be eating them daily, I need to make healthier choices. Plus, I have a reputation to uphold as the queen of paletas!

Whenever I buy too many bananas (which is basically always) and they start to get spots and are too ripe, I have to get creative with how to use them quickly. So I came up with this frozen treat version of a refrigerated banana chia pudding that I like to make when I’m trying to eat healthier. They’re not overly sweet or too banana-y, they’re very low-fat and not many calories per serving either (for the record, one serving is one popsicle). As you probably know, bananas are packed with potassium and Vitamin C as well as fiber and some other nutrients. Most of the sweetness in this recipe comes from the natural sugar in the bananas. Of course, if you like your popsicles on the sweeter side, you can always add a little extra sugar to the recipe if you want.

RELATED RECIPE: Coconut chia pudding

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No-churn Mexican vanilla ice cream with grilled pineapple topping

Make this no-churn Mexican vanilla ice cream with a grilled pineapple topping to serve at your next summer gathering!

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Nestlé El Mejor Nido. All opinions and the recipe here are my own. This post also contains product affiliate links to my Amazon store for ingredients and tools I’ve used to make the recipe.

No-churn Mexican vanilla ice cream with grilled pineapple topping - Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com

Summer and parillada season is upon us, and I love to serve a dessert that feels special like fireworks at the end of the evening — but without too much fuss.

I was browsing recipes at El Mejor Nido for summer dessert inspiration and came across an easy homemade strawberry ice cream that looked divine. I love the idea of making homemade ice cream with fresh seasonal fruit, but I don’t have an ice cream maker.

So instead, I created this no-churn version of a Mexican vanilla ice cream with a grilled pineapple topping. Sweetened condensed milk folded into freshly whipped cream is the key to this dish, and there’s a surprise ingredient — a very small amount of tequila — that helps keep the ice cream easy to scoop. The only real skill you’ll need is patience while it freezes!

 RELATED RECIPE: Frozen café con leche… 

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Easter egg gelatinas

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Nestlé El Mejor Nido. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Gelatinas are a popular dessert throughout Mexico and come in many unique flavors and shapes.

Of course, no holiday celebration is complete without one of your tías bringing her fanciest gelatina, right? My favorite kind of are the ones with colorful layers!
How to make Easter egg gelatinas with La Lechera sweetened condensed milk. Recipe via theothersideofthetortilla.com
I was making a list of Easter dessert ideas the other day to bring to my aunt’s house for our family’s celebration and I decided to check out ElMejorNido.com for some inspiration. I love that I can save, organize and rate recipes, as well as make shopping lists and get recipes and special offers delivered my inbox every month. I came across some great ideas and recipes for making gelatinas that sparked a memory…. 

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How to make orejas

Instructions how to make orejas, also known as palmiers. This popular Mexican pan dulce has only three ingredients: puff pastry, cinnamon and sugar. Recipe on theothersideofthetortilla.com.

Orejas, also known as palmiers, are a puff pastry cookie and kind of pan dulce commonly found in panaderías all over Mexico.

Pan dulce was made popular during the French occupation in the mid 1800s, and as Mexican President Porfirio Díaz was considered to be a Francophile, French influence on Mexico’s gastronomy was allowed to grow from the time Díaz first took control as president in 1880 and flourish into the early 1900s.

In 1911, Díaz left Mexico to live in exile in Paris when Madero became president; he would live there for four years before he died in 1915. And although Díaz died in exile, the French pastries and sweet breads adopted by Mexico morphed into uniquely Mexican creations, with a variety of shapes, textures and creative names that still exist today.

RELATED RECIPE: Cafe de olla… 

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Atole de vainilla

How to make Mexican atole de vainilla. Recipe via @MauraHernandez on The Other Side of The Tortilla.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Maseca, but all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Atole de vainilla is a traditional masa-based beverage, often made with milk, and served hot. This hot beverage goes great with tamales, pastries or pan dulce and is also most popular around Day of the Dead and the holidays. 

Atoles date back to pre-Columbian times in Mexico and are well-documented as a form of sustenance amongst the Aztec and Mayan cultures. Historical texts tell us the drink was often flavored with fruits, spices or chiles. 

Vanilla, strawberry and chocolate are the most common flavors of atole nowadays, but you can sometimes also find mora (blackberry; one of my favorites), nuez (pecan), pineapple, elote (sweet corn), piñon (pine nut), and many other flavors. In some areas of Mexico, you can even find savory atoles—one made with with green chile is called chileatole.

RELATED RECIPE: Champurrado… 

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Crepas de cajeta con nueces

How to make crepas de cajeta con nueces. Recipe on theothersideofthetortilla.com via @MauraHernandez.

This is a sponsored post, though all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Crepas de cajeta are a classic Mexican dessert with French influence. Although the French occupation of Mexico in the 1860s was relatively short-lived, French gastronomy had a lasting impact on the country, which is still apparent today in many dishes that are considered part of Mexican gastronomy. Crepas de cajeta con nueces—crepes with goat’s milk caramel and pecans—is a dish frequently served in upscale restaurants in Mexico, though it’s not too difficult to make at home.

It can be a bit laborious to make this dessert completely from scratch, as homemade cajeta can take several hours, but thanks to a few store-bought ingredients, you can whip up the same fancy taste in your own kitchen in about 20 minutes from start to finish…. 

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