Frozen Café con Leche

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Nestlé El Mejor Nido. All opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Make this frozen café con leche in your blender at home with just a few ingredients!

How to make a frozen café con leche frappe - Recipe via

Who doesn’t love a good café con leche? I have one a few days each week, but I almost always make them at home instead of buying them. My mom and I share a love for making copycat recipes at home. It’s become almost a game between us, and has been for many years. Why pay $6 or more for a large coffee house drink I can make better at home, and for much less money per serving?

I definitely inherited my mom’s gift for recreating recipes, so this Mother’s Day, I’m grateful that she shared her love of cooking and experimenting in the kitchen with me. I created this frozen café con leche with my mom in mind. She usually will ask me what kind of coffee I’m drinking lately, and then she gets hooked on it too. So even when we can’t have a cafecito together, we can at least enjoy the same drink despite the miles between us.

RELATED RECIPE: Mexican mocha latte… 

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Oaxacan Latte: The Mexican Mocha

This Oaxacan latte is also know as a Mexican mocha. It’s a unique coffee drink you can make at home.

Oaxacan latte recipe via

RELATED RECIPE: Café de olla

When I first moved to Los Angeles, a dear friend of mine introduced me to a Mexican bakery near where I’d be working. The first time she took me there, I ordered a drink similar to this recipe, called a Café Oaxaca, and have been making them at home ever since. In my first months in LA, I visited the bakery frequently because it was like a home base; a familiar place where I knew I’d find things I like. On days I felt like I was having a hard time adjusting to my new surroundings, I’d go to the bakery with my laptop, order this Mexican mocha and a piece of pan dulce, and I’d start to feel better.

A caffè mocha (a coffee creation which is similar to a drink called a mochaccino, the cappuccino version) is traditionally defined as espresso, chocolate and hot milk; it’s a chocolate-flavored variant of the standard caffè latte. Mexican chocolate gives this coffee drink a special twist, as the chocolate normally used is a chocolate syrup…. 

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Chile-spiced hot apple cider brandy cocktail


Growing up in the Midwest, I went apple picking every fall and loved to drink mulled hot apple cider. Although apple cider the way I grew up drinking it is really not consumed in Mexico, I came up with this recipe with the traditional American apple cider in mind; it’s made with apples that are easily found in Mexico along with Mexican cinnamon sticks, chile puya for a little kick, and sweetened with piloncillo — all ingredients that are muy mexicano.

Chile puya brings an earthy, fruity, moderate heat to this mulled hot apple cider that can be served with a splash of brandy on cold winter nights. It’s the perfect warm cocktail to serve during the holidays as well!

Chile puya looks just like a smaller version of chile guajillo, both in color and shape, but is spicier. If you can’t find chile puya, or want a milder spice, you can substitute a guajillo chile in this recipe. I advise that you start out with one chile and work your way up if you think it needs to be spicier. Either way, be sure to remove the seeds and veins inside the chiles…. 

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Atole de calabaza

How to make Mexican atole de calabaza. A gluten-free hot beverage perfect for fall and winter! Recipe via

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Maseca, but all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Atole de calabaza is a masa-based beverage made with milk, thickened with Maseca corn flour, and served hot. This pumpkin-flavored version tastes similar to pumpkin pie and is perfect for serving around Thanksgiving.

Although vanilla, chocolate (called champurrado) and strawberry are the most common atole flavors, there are many other common flavors such as pumpkin, or modern, non-traditional flavors such as blueberry cardamom atole. I love to serve this pumpkin atole with conchas (a type of pan dulce, pictured above).

RELATED RECIPE: Atole de vainilla

Thanksgiving is right around the corner and pumpkin pie is always a staple in my house at this time of year. As a kid, I always used to want to drink the leftover pumpkin pie filling, which my mom would warn me against doing since it contains raw eggs. I’d manage to drink some anyway and usually everything was fine, but occasionally, I’d end up with a stomachache. This atole tastes very similar to pumpkin pie filling thanks to the creaminess from the evaporated milk and has no risk from the eggs like pumpkin pie filling. What more could I ask for? It’s the perfect breakfast or dessert when served with some pan dulce!… 

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Atole de vainilla

How to make Mexican atole de vainilla. Recipe via @MauraHernandez on The Other Side of The Tortilla.

This post is part of a compensated campaign with Maseca, but all opinions and the recipe here are my own.

Atole de vainilla is a traditional masa-based beverage, often made with milk, and served hot. This hot beverage goes great with tamales, pastries or pan dulce and is also most popular around Day of the Dead and the holidays. 

Atoles date back to pre-Columbian times in Mexico and are well-documented as a form of sustenance amongst the Aztec and Mayan cultures. Historical texts tell us the drink was often flavored with fruits, spices or chiles. 

Vanilla, strawberry and chocolate are the most common flavors of atole nowadays, but you can sometimes also find mora (blackberry; one of my favorites), nuez (pecan), pineapple, elote (sweet corn), piñon (pine nut), and many other flavors. In some areas of Mexico, you can even find savory atoles—one made with with green chile is called chileatole.

RELATED RECIPE: Champurrado… 

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Carajillo: The coffee cocktail

A classic Spanish cocktail popular in Mexico, the Carajillo is made with espresso and Licor 43.

How to make a carajillo, the Spanish coffee cocktail that's popular in Mexico. Recipe via @MauraHernandez at The Other Side of The Tortilla

I’ve often enjoyed this cocktail while in Mexico, whether it be at a fancy restaurant in Mexico City, a late-night coffee bar in Acapulco or at vacation resorts spanning the country from Los Cabos to Playa del Carmen. This drink is also similar to Italy’s caffè corretto (meaning “corrected coffee”) which typically contains grappa, sambuca or brandy and espresso. The Carajillo can be served hot or cold, over ice, as pictured here.

RELATED RECIPE: Cafe de olla… 

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